• Quarter Three Survival Unit-Informational Focus

    Informational and Narrative Writing

    Essential Question: How is the will to survive a basic human instinct as depicted in the texts?

    Reading Complex Texts Standards

    R.I. and RL 8.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly

    supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as

    inferences drawn from the text.

     

     

    * I can define textual evidence. (K) * I can define inference. (K) * I can identify main ideas and supporting details to explain information in text. (K) * I can formulate answers to literal and inferential question and support my response with explicitly textual evidence. (A)

    R.I. 8.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its

    development over the course of the text, including its

    relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary

    of the text. * I can define central idea (K) * I can define supporting details. (K) * I can generate a summary. (A) * I can analyze the relationship between central idea and supporting details. (A) * I can analyze how the central idea develops over the course of the text. (A)

    RI 8.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they

    are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and

    technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices

    on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other

    texts

    * I can define figurative language. (K) * I can define connotative language. (K) * I can define technical/academic words. (K) * I can identify what an allusion is. (K) * I can determine the meanings of words and phrases as used in text. (K) * I can identify tone. (K) * I can identify how word choices impacts meaning and/or tone. (A)

    RI 8.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text

    and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to

    conflicting evidence or viewpoints

    * I can identify point of view. (K) * I can identify author’s purpose. (K) * I can identify the author’s argument and counter-argument. (K) * I can analyze the author’s argument and counter-argument. (A)

    RI 8.7 Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using

    different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia)

    to present a particular topic or idea

    * I can define what a medium is in relationship to informational text. (K) * I can explain the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present a topic or idea. (K) * I can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present a topic or idea. (A)

    RI 8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary

    nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6–8 text complexity

    band independently and proficiently.

    RL 8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze

    its development over the course of the text, including its

    relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an

    objective summary of the text. * I can identify theme or the central idea. (K) * I can analyze the development of theme. (A) * I can analyze or theme or the central idea relates to the characters, setting and/or plot. (A) * I can provide an objective summary of a text. (A)

    RL 8.6 Analyze how differences in the points of view of the

    characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the

    use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or

    humor. * I can identify point of view. (K) * I can identify author’s purpose. (K) * I can identify the author’s argument and counter-argument. (K) * I can analyze the author’s argument and counter-argument. (A)

    RL 8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend

    literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end

    of grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and

    proficiently.

     

     

     

     

     

    Writing Standards

    W 8.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection,

    organization, and analysis of relevant content.

     

    a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories;

    include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

    b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and

    examples.

    c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts

    d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

    e. Establish and maintain a formal style.

    f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented

     

     

    W 8.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and

    well-structured event sequences

    a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters;

    organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically

    b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, and reflection, to develop experiences, events, and/or

    characters.

    c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting to

    another, and show the relationships among experiences and events.

    d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey

    experiences and events

    e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

    W 8.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and

    audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

    W 8.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising,

    editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for

    conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 8)

    W 8.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and

    ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

    W 8.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single

    sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

    Listening and Speaking Standards

    CC.8.SL.1.b Comprehension and Collaboration: Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track progress toward specific goals

    and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.

    CC.8.SL.1.c Comprehension and Collaboration: Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and respond to others’ questions

    and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas.

    Language Standards

    CC.8.L.1.b Conventions of Standard English: Form and use verbs in the active and passive voice.

    CC.8.L.2 Conventions of Standard English: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and

    spelling when writing

    CC.8.L.2.b Conventions of Standard English: Use an ellipsis to indicate an omission

    Reading Complex Texts

    One Extended Text * Bomb: The Race To Build--And Steal--The World's Most Dangerous Weapon (Honors) * SAS Survival Handbook: The ultimate guide to surviving anywhere ( 1 copy per teacher) * The Great Fire (ELL Kids and Lower Level Students) * Night (Honors) * An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793 by Jim Murphy (Regular Education Students) * When Plague Strikes: The Black Death, Smallpox, Aids by James Cross Giblin (excerpts)

    1-2 Literature Short Texts * The Most Dangerous Game (electronic copy) * The Yellow Wallpaper by Perkins Gilman * The Open Boat * To Build a Fire * The Lady or the Tiger * Excerpt from “Fever 1793” by Laurie Halse Anderson

    2-3 Informational Texts * Survival Bootcamp (digital text) , * Primary Source Document of Atomic Bomb First Hand Accounts and The Great Fire First Hand Accounts * Into Thin Air (Rev It Up Book Article) , * The Perfect Storm (excerpt) * “Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat Address to Parliament on May 13, 1940” * How to Survive in the Woods * Andes Flight Disaster and Cannibalism * Albert Einstein Letter to President Roosevelt about Atomic Bomb

    Writing to Texts

    Routine Writing

    4-6 Analyses (3-4 Informational based on Close Read

    Prompts and 1 Summative) * “Mother to Son” * “Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat Address to Parliament on May 13, 1940”-Describe how Churchill’s use of repetition and/or rhetorical questions advances the theme of courage. Cite at least two examples from the text to support your thesis. * Summative: Reflecting on the texts read and discussed in class, write an informational essay in response to the essential question: How is the will to survive a basic human instinct as depicted in the texts? * Informational: Research and write an informational essay on a real life survival story.

    1 Narrative Write your own survival story. Continue the story of the Lady or the Tiger.

    Research Project

    1 Research Project Research and write a paper on a real life survival story.

    Vocabulary Pre-selected vocabulary for “The Most Dangerous Game,” “The Yellow Wallpaper,” etc. (see teacher created graphic organizers)