• ELA Unit 4: 

     

    Enduring Understandings/Essential Questions

    How does the idea of freedom as depicted through different texts reflect a common human desire?

    End of Unit Culminating Project/Research Project



    Reading Standards

    Common Core Standards

    I Can Statements

     

    Key Ideas and Details

    CC.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

    CC.RI.8.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.

    I can determine the theme or central idea of a text.

    I can provide a summary of the text.

     

     

     

    I can determine the theme or central idea of a text.


    I can provide a summary of the text.

    Reading Standards in All Units

    RL 8.1 and RI 8.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

     

    RL 8.10 and RI 8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

    Formative/Summative Assessments

    Formative:
    Entrance/Exit Slips, Multiple Choice, Short Answer, Selective Highlighting, Write-Around-the-Text, Think-Pair-Share, Group Discussions, Mini-Literature Circles, Concept Map (CRISS Strategies)

    Summative

    Assessment 1: Information

    Standards: RI 8.1, RI 8.2

     

    Task: Multiple Choice on Themes/Central Ideas, Highlight/Underline Textual Evidence

     

    Text: Fredrick Douglas

     

     

     

    Summative: Part E: (PARCC : See Above)Test

    Guided Reading

    (Comprehension Focus)

    Gradual Release of Responsibility

    Week One:  Week of April 15, 2013

    Topic: Identification of Themes and Central Ideas

    Standards: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

    Strategies: Giver—Frayer Model (Utopia), Double Entry Journals (inference), Anticipation Guide—Aranda (literature note for guidance for ELL students) Of Mice and Men—concept of a definition map, Venn Diagram, You Ought to Be in Pictures, Selective Highlighting, Double Entry Journals

    Close Reading Text (Whole Group):Walt Whitman’s “O Captain, My Captain”; Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” Speech, “To a Mouse” by Robert Burns

    Extended Text: The Giver(Sweiss, Aranda, Nowicki/Theodore), Flowers for Algernon, Of Mice and Men(Rabig, Pench), etc. (Teacher/Student Choice), To Kill a Mockingbird

    Short Texts (Student-Read): See Text Box below of Highlighted Short Texts

     

     

     

    Week: Week of April 22, 2013

    Topic: Identification of Themes and Central Ideas

    Standards: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

    Strategies: Giver—Frayer Model (Utopia), Double Entry Journals (inference), Anticipation Guide—Aranda (literature note for guidance for ELL students) Of Mice and Men—concept of a definition map, Venn Diagram, You Ought to Be in Pictures, Selective Highlighting, Double Entry Journals

    Close Reading Text (Whole Group): Maya Angelou’s “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” , “Imagine” by John Lennon

    Extended Text: The Giver, Flowers for Algernon, Of Mice and Men, etc. (Teacher Choice), To Kill a Mockingbird

    Short Texts (Student-Read): See Text Box below of Highlighted Short Texts

    Week: Week of April 29, 2012

    Topic: Analysis of Theme and Textual Support 

    Standards: Cite textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.


    Strategies: Giver—Frayer Model (Utopia), Double Entry Journals (inference), Anticipation Guide—Aranda (literature note for guidance for ELL students) Of Mice and Men—concept of a definition map, Venn Diagram, You Ought to Be in Pictures, Selective Highlighting, Double Entry Journals

    Close Reading Text (Whole Group): Robert Frost’s “Road Not Taken”

    Extended Text: The Giver, Flowers for Algernon, Of Mice and Men, etc. (Teacher Choice), To Kill a Mockingbird

    Short Texts (Student-Read): See Text Box below of Highlighted Short Texts

     

    Week: Week of May 6, 2013

    Topic: Analysis of Theme and Textual Support 

    Standards: Cite textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.


    Strategies:
    Giver—Frayer Model (Utopia), Double Entry Journals (inference), Anticipation Guide—Aranda (literature note for guidance for ELL students) Of Mice and Men—concept of a definition map, Venn Diagram, You Ought to Be in Pictures, Selective Highlighting, Double Entry Journals


    Close Reading Text (Whole Group):
    Holocaust Texts
    http://www.adl.org/children_holocaust/children_main1.asp


    Extended Text: The Giver, Flowers for Algernon, Of Mice and Men, etc. (Teacher Choice), To Kill a Mockingbird

    Short Texts (Student-Read): See Text Box below of Highlighted Short Texts

    Writing Prompt

    Narrative

    Argumentative

    Write a short story with a theme of freedom and/or dreams.

    How does the idea of freedom as depicted through different texts reflect a common human desire?

    Writing Standards

    CC.8.W.9.a Apply grade 8 Reading standards to literature

    (e.g., “Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes,

     patterns of events, or character types from myths,

    traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible,

     including describing how the material is rendered new”).

    CC.8.W.9.b Apply grade 8 Reading standards to literary nonfiction

    (e.g., “Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims

    in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the

     evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant

    evidence is introduced”).

    Writing Lessons

    Reader Responses

    Journal Entries

    Narrative Writing

    Language Standards

     

    Listening and Speaking Standards

     

    Texts

    Required Reading

     

    See Text Box Below of Selected Readings

    Leveled Guided Reading Texts

     

           Reading A to Z text

     

    WWII background

    Arrows Fiction (fiction) Levels R, U, & Y – grades 3,4,5

    Escape from the Holocaust (nonfiction) Level Y grade 5

    The Message (historical fiction) Level Z grade 5

    The Tuskegee Airmen (nonfiction) Level V grade 4

    Veterans Day (nonfiction) Level U grade 4

    Summer Olympics Legends (Nonfiction) Level O grade 2

     

    Freedom Texts

    Martin Luther King Jr. (nonfiction) Levels M, P, S grades 2,3

    Protests and Uprisings (nonfiction) Level Y grade 5

    Ben Franklin (nonfiction) Level W grade 4

    Abraham Lincoln: From Log Cabin to the White House (nonfiction) Level Z grade 5

    Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad (nonfiction) Level S grade 3

    Nelson Mandela (nonfiction) Level W grade 4

     

     

     

     

    Vocabulary

     

    Text

    Words

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Lexile: 860-1010; (old) 1010-1185 (new)
    3-5 Texts (close reading); 1 Extended Text
    Extended/Independent = Yellow Whole Group Texts/Close Reading: Green Short Text/Guided Reading: Blue

    Nonfiction/Lexile:

    Fiction/Lexile:

    Poetry/Drama:

    1.       Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” Speech (1000L)
    2. Maya Angelou’s “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” (1070L)
    3. Susan B. Anthony’s “Women’s Right to Suffrage” (1200L)
    4. Abraham Lincoln’s “Emancipation” (990L)
    5. Walter Dean Meyers “Brown vs. Board of Education”(1160L))
    6. Jay-Z Decoded
    7. Powell’s “From Sharing in the American Dream” (780L)
    8. Article on Dream Interpretations
    9. Excerpt from “Homeless to Harvard”
    10. Steve Jobs’ Commencement Speech to Stanford http://news.stanford.edu/news/2005/june15/jobs-061505.html
    11. Bill Gates Biography
    12. Shaquille O'Neal Biography
    13.Pakistani Girl http://www.timeforkids.com/news/attack-pakistan/52351
    14. Malala Yousafzai: A Young Pakistani heroine
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/oct/10/malala-yousafzai-young-pakistani-heroine
    15.. Right to Vote in Saudi Arabia
    http://www.timeforkids.com/news/right-vote/14371

    2.       To Kill A Mockingbird

                     Treatment of Blacks Plessy vs. Ferguson trial

                     The Scottsboro boys

                     The Klu Klux Klan lynching

    3.        The Giver---

                     Articles on Amish, Shakers

                     Articles on N. Korea



    1.       Excerpt from Tom Sawyer’s Huckleberry Finn (850L)
    2. Excerpt from The Circuit (880L)
    3. Lois Lowry’s The Giver (760 Lexile)
    4. Sandra Cisneros House on Mango Street (870L)
    5. Harper Lee’s”To Kill a Mockingbird” (870L)
    6. Excerpt from Of Mice and Men (630L)
    7. George Orwell’s Animal Farm (1170L)
    8. Ayn Rand’s Anthem (880L)
    9. “Flowers for Algernon” by Daniel Keyes

    2.       The Children’s Story by James Clavell

    The Lottery by Shirley Jackson

    The Wave by Todd Strasser

    Langston Hughes’, “Harlem”
    Langston Hughes, “Mother to Son”
    Robert Frost “Road Not Taken”
    Walt Whitman “O Captain, My Captain”



    Drama:
    Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare
    Diary of Anne Frank
    READ Magazines

    Digital Media: (United Streaming)
    The Dust Bowl
    The Berlin Wall
    Civil Rights Marches
    Holocaust Videos (United Streaming)

    The Shakers—Hearts and Hands to God video




    http://www.warsaw.k12.ny.us/files/1392433/ela-grade-8.pdf
    *There is a narrative of Frederick Douglass and Helen Keller in this Sample with a short answer question
    http://www.cleavebooks.co.uk/grol/index.htm
    *Online text of Frankenstein and Dracula - and others